Do I Have Shin Splints?

shinsplintpic“Shin splints” is a general term referring to pain along the shinbone (tibia) — the large bone in the front of your lower leg. The pain can originate on the front of your lower leg (anterior shin splints) or the back (posterior shin splints). Shin splints are very common, mostly in runners of all ages, dancers and servicemen and women.

The medical term for the most common type of shin splints is medial tibial stress syndrome. Shin splints are most often caused by changes in intensity of exercise, changes in training routines, or generally overworked muscles, tendons and bone tissues related to motion (usually running). Lots of people experience them when they change their run to more uneven terrain (up hills for example). You can also get shin splints by doing repetitive activities that require a lot of starting and stopping (like dance or military exercise). Basically, shin splints occur as a result of overloading your shin bones. Different than a muscle cramp, shin splints persist, often over days or weeks if untreated. In general, shin splints are more painful than they are dangerous, but some active treatment is wise. Continue reading “Do I Have Shin Splints?”

Please, Tell Me About Knees!

Your knees are among the largest joints in your body and are under intense weight-bearing strain and used daily–no wonder they hurt sometimes.

The knee joint joins your thigh bone (femur) and your shin bone (tibia). The fibula bone runs alongside the tibia and, along with the kneecap (patella), make up the rest of the bones in the knee. Two c-shaped pieces of cartilage, the medial and lateral menisci, act as shock absorbers between femur and tibia.

The knee joint is the most complex in the body.  It’s a “condylar” joint, meaning it has two protrusions on the femur (called condyles) and the the tibia has two grooves which enable them to roll and slide against each others. Because of it’s unique structure, it’s also a hinge joint.

Continue reading “Please, Tell Me About Knees!”