If You Play Soccer, You NEED Massage

Soccer is the third most played team sport in the US (13 million Americans), behind basketball and baseball. Soccer players get great exercise and training and play increase agility, better coordination, and build team skills. As the sport’s popularity soars, so do the injuries. With a little planning, however, serious soccer players can use massage to help them reduce injuries and increase their flexibility and range of motion on the field.

Common injuries

Most injuries in soccer are limited to the lower extremes. Sprains and strains are common, as are injuries from a knee twist, or a not-too-well placed kick from another play. Overuse injuries also occur.

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Top 5 Running Injuries

Runners of all skill levels usually experience some kind of injury, ache or pain. Most of the time, running injuries happen when you overexert, or when you’re not paying attention to proper body mechanics, or sometimes just dumb luck.

Here’s a quick list of the top five of the most common injuries (WebMD, et al) and some ideas about how to treat them.

1. Runner’s knee. Basically, this is when your form, running shoes, or terrain causes your kneecap to misalign. You’ll especially feel this when sitting for a long time, squatting, or climbing a hill or stairs. Over time, the cartilage around your kneecap can wear down causing bone-to-bone friction which results in pain, especially around the edges of your kneecap.

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Do I Have Shin Splints?

shinsplintpic“Shin splints” is a general term referring to pain along the shinbone (tibia) — the large bone in the front of your lower leg. The pain can originate on the front of your lower leg (anterior shin splints) or the back (posterior shin splints). Shin splints are very common, mostly in runners of all ages, dancers and servicemen and women.

The medical term for the most common type of shin splints is medial tibial stress syndrome. Shin splints are most often caused by changes in intensity of exercise, changes in training routines, or generally overworked muscles, tendons and bone tissues related to motion (usually running). Lots of people experience them when they change their run to more uneven terrain (up hills for example). You can also get shin splints by doing repetitive activities that require a lot of starting and stopping (like dance or military exercise). Basically, shin splints occur as a result of overloading your shin bones. Different than a muscle cramp, shin splints persist, often over days or weeks if untreated. In general, shin splints are more painful than they are dangerous, but some active treatment is wise. Continue reading “Do I Have Shin Splints?”

Replace Your Running Shoes!

wornrunningshoesYour running shoes provide cushioning, shock absorption and stability and over time, like any other often used item, they wear out.

As a general rule, running shoes last about 300-400 miles, while walking shoes last around 500.

You can also examine the shoes for wear patterns. It turns out that you don’t use the treads on the bottom of the shoes to determine whether to replace them, nor does the fact that they’re dirty mean you need to replace them. Instead, examine the midsole area.

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