Posture 101: Pelvic Tilt

If you’ve ever heard of someone with “swayback” or “no butt”, then you’ve seen the results of postural changes related to pelvic tilt.  The pelvis is a bony structure that connects the base of your spine to the upper end of each of your legs. A healthy pelvis is important for movement, stability and posture.

There are basically two types of postural deficiencies involving the pelvis: anterior pelvic tilt and posterior pelvic tilt.

The most common type of pelvic deficiency occurs when your pelvis is tilted forward, known technically as anterior pelvic tilt (APT). APT is more common in females, but many males have it too. This is a relatively common postural deviation characterized by a forward tipped pelvis, increased lower back curve (sway back) and sometimes a bulging (but not necessarily fat) abdomen. The tilt is a result of tight or stiff hip flexor muscles (posts, iliac, rectus femoris, tensor facia late, erector spinae) coupled with poor or unequal gluteal, hamstring, oblique or abdominal muscle strength. Continue reading “Posture 101: Pelvic Tilt”